The Big Trip: Taupo

On the day we left Rotorua there was a number of activities to choose from in the morning.  You could do your best Mario Kart impression at the Skyline Rotorua Luge, you could marvel at the magnificent geothermal activity and Maori culture at Te Puia or you could be a cheapskate and enjoy a refreshing stroll around the Rotorua Redwood Forest.  We chose the third option as we were trying to save money plus we’d missed seeing the Redwoods in California.

The Redwood forest has fantastic walks, hikes and mountain biking trails as well as a tree walk.  We had limited time so could only do one of the short trails which took us around some of the tallest trees.  It was a great opportunity to stretch our legs and get some fresh air.

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After leaving the forest we stopped back in Rotorua to have lunch. Once everyone had gathered from the various different activities we made our way to Taupo.

Our final scenic stop for the day was at Huka Falls.  The falls are part of the Waikato River, which drains into Lake Taupo.  The river, which is normally 328-feet (100m) wide, is squeezed through a gorge only 65-feet (20m) wide with a drop of 65-feet.  Every second around 48,000-gallons (220,000 litres) of water gush through the gorge.  The result of this is a very loud, very blue falls pictured below.

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In Taupo we stayed at the Courtney Motel rather than at the Kiwi Experience guaranteed accommodation.  We had a studio unit which comprised of a studio living space with bedroom, dining space and kitchenette and a separate bathroom.  The motel was far enough from town that we weren’t disturbed by the bars but not so far away that it was a pain to walk to the supermarket or to wander around.  It worked out perfectly for us allowing us to get some much needed rest whilst it poured with rain outside.

Taupo is a town located on the shores of Lake Taupo.  The lake was formed following the collapse of Taupo Volcano and is 238-square miles (616-square kilometres) in surface area.  It is the second largest lake within the Oceania area and is 610-feet (186m) at it’s deepest point.

Despite there being many activities on offer in Taupo, we opted to just relax and mooch around the town if we felt like we needed to get a bit of fresh air.  We did, however, complete the Tongariro Crossing but we’re saving the details of that for our next post.

As always, be sure to check out of video here if you haven’t already.

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